the why: because it matters.

i started putting together a brand spotlight post for today {which will probably post on monday} but then i realized that i really just needed to write a little bit more about why all of this matters.

up until about a year ago i didn’t think about who made my clothes. i’d see the tags that said “made in china” or “made in vietnam” and i didn’t think any deeper than that. when the factory collapsed in bangladesh in 2013 i thought about it for a time. i considered it a little bit, but if i’m being honest it didn’t stick for very long. or even more bluntly, i didn’t want to think about it.

because it’s hard.

it’s hard to consider whether or not companies are utilizing their workers in an ethical way. a lot of them aren’t. and we don’t like to think about ugly truths. so often, we just don’t.

unfortunately there are a lot of ugly truths in the fashion world. and that’s why this is important.

because people matter.

we cannot simultaneously say that we fight against the injustices of the world, and that we want to make the world a better, more equal place, and perpetuate an unethical system by what we choose to buy.

it’s all linked.

there’s an #ethicalfashion movement that is picking up steam. and i am so grateful that this information is more readily available.

{on instagram via @fash_rev}

along with this call-to-arms {of sorts} a hashtag has started showing up on instagram – mostly via fashion revolution {@fash_rev}: #whomademyclothes. these are interviews with various types of garment workers about who they are, and what they do to make our clothes.

{on instagram via @fash_rev}

i know that i feel better in my clothes when they fit well and they look good. but i also feel better in my clothes when i know that purchasing them supported a company who is doing the right thing by the people who work for them.

{on instagram via @fash_rev}

it’s a learning process, and i know i have so much more to learn, but the important thing is that we keep trying to learn. that we don’t throw up our hands and say that it’s too hard, and stop thinking about it.

the well-being of the roughly 40 million people who work in the garment industry demands that we think about it.

the point of this post is not to make you feel guilty for the purchases you’ve made, {trust me, i’ve spent a lot of time there} but to encourage you to think about the impact your purchases have, and possibly do something differently now. we can only begin where we are.

enjoy your weekend!

xo

kate

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